• Cold vs. Flu

    Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/coldflu.htm

    What is the difference between a cold and the flu?

    The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. Because these two types of illnesses have similar symptoms, it can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations. Flu can have very serious associated complications.

    How can you tell the difference between a cold and the flu?

    Because colds and flu share many symptoms, it can be difficult (or even impossible) to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Special tests that usually must be done within the first few days of illness can tell if a person has the flu.

    What are the symptoms of the flu versus the symptoms of a cold?

    The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue (tiredness). Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems.

    * It is important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

  • Flu Complications

    Source:  Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/index.html

    Most people who get influenza will recover in several days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications as a result of the flu. A wide range of complications can be caused by influenza virus infection of the upper respiratory tract (nasal passages, throat) and lower respiratory tract (lungs). While anyone can get sick with flu and become severely ill, some people are more likely to experience severe flu illness. Young children, adults aged 65 years and older, pregnant women, and people with certain chronic medical conditions are among those groups of people who are at high risk of serious flu complications.

    Sinus and ear infections are examples of moderate complications from flu, while pneumonia is a serious flu complication that can result from either influenza virus infection alone or from co-infection of flu virus and bacteria.

    Click here for the CDC's FAQs for the 2017-2018 Flu season.

    Click here for Common misconceptions about the flu vaccine addressed by the CDC. 

    Remember! Handwashing is the single most important way we can prevent the spread of germs!

  • Cold vs. Flu (source: CDC)